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Thanks to input from our valued users on Capitol Hill and federal, state, and local government agencies all around the country, IQ is now faster, more robust, and more powerful than ever before.  But we're not done yet.  Our team constantly evaluates performance and monitors industry trends to make sure the #1 CRM on Capitol Hill keeps getting better.  Keep reading to learn about some of the major enhancements we've already made this year plus updates and new features to look forward to in the coming weeks and beyond!

Q2 2018: IQ Gets Faster

We optimized IQ for the House Cloud resulting in increased performance capacity and increases in speed of up to 30%.  Updates for even faster performance are on the way!  Watch this short video to see how House offices use IQ to be more efficient and effective in their work with the public.

Q4 2018: Collaborate with Colleagues 

Just like Google Docs and other online collaboration tools, IQ now allows multiple users to collaborate and co-edit form letters in real time, directly within IQ.  Save time, improve accuracy and get approval faster by using this new IQ function.

Q4 2018: eNewsletter Overhaul

The overhauled eNewsletter tool in IQ makes it easier to produce and send high impact, high quality email content to your constituents.  Compelling visuals and professional quality layouts in your outgoing email efforts are just a few clicks away.  No design experience required.

Q1 2019: Email Automation

New email automation functionality in IQ will allow you to build "smart" email campaigns that automatically optimize your outreach based on performance metrics and constituent engagement.  This game-changing new feature will dramatically change the way you can communicate to the public using IQ.

Q1 2019: New Mapping Interface

IQ users will have the ability to overlay critical issue and message data with a new mapping interface that displays boundaries for states, Congressional districts and counties.  This new feature gives frontline staff and executive management new insights on the public from a detailed geographic standpoint for data driven decision making.

2019: Machine Learning

Our developers are hard at work building an innovative machine learning platform for IQ that will make recommendations for categorizing and responding to incoming messages.  Planned for release some time in 2019, machine learning in IQ will save staffers even more time and free them up for other priorities and goals.

 

To learn more about how IQ has evolved and what's to come, contact us at iq.info@leidos.com

 

 

 

Election Day is Here!

November 6, 2018

One of the most highly-anticipated and bitterly contested midterm elections is today.  Here are a few observations as we wait for results:

Early voting

With over 40 million Americans having cast early ballots in 2018, early turnout and mail ballot counts have smashed previous years' figures.  In fact, early voting is up almost 45% over the 2014 midterm election.  In Texas and Nevada, early voting has eclipsed total voter turnout in 2014.  So what does it all mean?  Some pollsters suggest that the dramatic jump in early votes could signal a larger than expected "blue wave".  Others data scientists warn against making such predictions and don't use early voting figures at all in their projections.

The year of the woman

A record 53 women ran for Senate in 2018 and 476 women ran for office in the House.  Twenty two of the 53 running for Senate won party nominations and 235 women won their House primaries.  That makes a total of 257 women on ballots today for service in the 116th Congress.  And let's not forget about the power female voters hold this year.  Women aged 18-44 are expected to be a critical demographic in dozens of races around the country.  Four in ten women in that age bracket saying they are "more enthusiastic" about voting this year than any previous election.  Polling shows that twice as many women aged 18-44 identify as Democrats versus Republicans so the GOP has its work cut out to capture this key voter group today.

Big names on the stump

If you weren't aware of the massive implications of today's midterms, just take a look at who's been on the campaign trail.  National figures including President Trump, former President Obama and former VP Joe Biden have inserted themselves into races across the country with intensity that has not historically been seen in midterm elections.  President Trump alone has hit the campaign trail hard, recently undertaking several grueling multi-stop travel days for campaign rallies.  For the Democrats, Joe Biden has been spotted knocking on doors and helping with canvassing efforts.

Turnout, turnout, turnout

Every political novice knows that turnout is always critical to victory but seasoned observers have noticed a trend that may be encouraging to Democrats in 2018.  In every special election in both 2017 and 2018, Democrats have increased their turnout compared to relative turnout increase for Republicans. Sign of a blue wave?  Some pollsters say yes.  But not so fast.  Donald Trump has mostly managed to dominate the headlines, even without his name on the ballot today.  Most political observers see turnout driven by enthusiasm for—and against the President. Will President Trump's star power and economic successes help the GOP hold their majorities?  We'll know soon enough!

 

Leidos Digital Solution, Inc. is the leading provider of IT Services and Consulting to government offices on Capitol Hill plus federal, state and local government agencies around the country.

As wild as the 2016 presidential election and the preceding campaigns were, it’s hard to believe that the 2018 midterm elections are practically upon us. And yet, nearly half of primary elections have already taken place. So what’s in store for America in November? Here we’ll examine the trends we’ve seen so far from the primary elections.

  • Of the 194 Democratic seats in the House, 185 of those are considered safe.  Of the 236 Republican seats in the House, 174 are believed to go safely back into GOP hands. 

  • Retirements will play a major role in 2018.  There are 32 Members of the House of Representatives retiring this year including the most high profile Member of all, Speaker of the House, Paul Ryan. Add 14 resignations in the House and you’ve got nearly 50 seats up for grabs.  On the Senate side, only 3 retirements have been announced on top of 3 resignations. The death of Rep. Louise Slaughter of New York in March leaves an additional vacancy in the House. 

  • Of the hundreds of Congressional races scheduled for November, dozens are considered competitive races according to ratings watchers. Of the competitive races, 17 are likely to lean Democratic, 20 are considered tossups, and 57 are likely to lean Republican.

  • The anti-establishment wave felt during the 2016 elections continues, though perhaps not as dramatically. For progressives, the biggest shakeup came during Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s shocking victory against 10-term incumbent Joe Crowley in New York’s 14th Congressional District primary. Far left candidates also won two gubernatorial primaries: Ben Jealous in Maryland and Rep. Jared Polis in Colorado.

  • Another shocking upset came from North Carolina’s 9th District GOP primary where three-term incumbent Rep. Robert Pittenger was defeated by newcomer Mark Harris of Charlotte, NC. In a district once considered solidly Republican, the GOP nominee will face off against Charlotte Democrat and former marine Dan McCready in an election now considered a “toss up” by many analysts. Mark Harris, who considers himself a populist in the mold of President Donald Trump, mobilized evangelical and conservative voters. 

  • Women are running, and winning, in larger numbers than ever before. Of all the candidates running in the midterms nearly 600 are women.  469 female candidates for seats in the House, 53 for the Senate, and 73 women are running for governorships. More than half of these candidates have already made it through their primaries, and so far, more women have won than lost.

These are just a few of the key takeaways from the primary season so far, but it looks like it’s shaping up to be another interesting fall and a wild November.